PTSD, or posttraumatic stress disorder, is a set of reactions that can occur after someone has been through a traumatic event. The chance of developing PTSD depends on the type of event experienced, but about 5 to 10% of Australians will suffer from PTSD at some point in their lives.

 

Could I have posttraumatic stress disorder?

The main symptoms of PTSD are:

  • Re-living the traumatic event through distressing, unwanted memories, vivid nightmares and/or flashbacks. This can also include feeling very upset or having intense physical reactions such as heart palpitations or being unable to breathe when reminded of the traumatic event.
  • Avoiding reminders of the traumatic event, including activities, places, people, thoughts or feelings that bring back memories of the trauma.
  • Negative thoughts and feelings such as fear, anger, guilt, or feeling flat or numb a lot of the time. A person might blame themselves or others for what happened during or after the traumatic event, feel cut-off from friends and family, or lose interest in day-to-day activities.
  • Feeling wound-up. This might mean having trouble sleeping or concentrating, feeling angry or irritable, taking risks, being easily startled, and/or being constantly on the lookout for danger.
  • It is not unusual for people with PTSD to experience other mental health problems as well, like depression or anxiety. Some people may develop a habit of using alcohol or drugs as a way of coping.

 

Getting help

If you have experienced something traumatic and are still having problems two weeks or more later, talk to your GP or a mental health professional.

 

If you are struggling to cope after a traumatic event, talk to your GP. You don’t need to keep feeling like this. Effective treatments are available and you can get better.